A primer on the digitisation of administrative tribunals

As followers of my blog will probably know by now, I am interested in the development of digital/online administrative tribunals in the UK, and I have been spending time researching this in recent months. I have now created a new page on this site to provide a home for updates on the reforms and my…

UKAJI New Voices Workshop

Following on from the creation of the UKAJI Early Career Researchers Network in 2016, a one-day workshop – funded and supported by UKAJI – will be hosted at the University of Sheffield on 1 September 2017. The workshop will feature a range of early career researchers, along with a panel of senior researchers to discuss…

The Policy and Politics of Building Tribunals for a Digital Age

I have written a blog post, for the UK Constitutional Law Blog, on the digitisation of tribunals in the UK. In the post, I highlight how this new age of tribunals brings with it new political and policy dynamics, which bear on the design process and, ultimately, the resulting system. I argue that it is important…

Review of Cane’s Controlling Administrative Power

I have recently written a review of Peter Cane’s new book, Controlling Administrative Power: An Historical Comparison, for the blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and Constitution-Making (I*CONnect). It is available here.  

The Gap Between Promise and Performance in Administrative Justice Systems

I have written a new blog article on the gap between promise and performance in administrative justice systems, which has been published via the Administrative Law in the Common Law World blog.  It is available here. The blog takes a typology developed in constitutional theory–concerning ‘sham’ constitutions’–and applies it to administrative justice. I suggest that, in its new…

Design Thinking for Administrative Redress: Some Preliminaries

I am presenting a working paper at an event—‘Contemporary Challenges in Constitutional Theory: International, European and Domestic Perspectives’—at the University of Liverpool (19 – 20 June 2017). The paper builds on work by Lorne Sossin, applying design thinking to administrative justice. The abstract for the paper is as follows: While many details of administrative functions…

Law, Society, and Administration in a Changing World

I will be speaking, with Professor Robert Thomas (University of Manchester), at the WG Hart Workshop on ‘Law, Society, and Administration in a Changing World’. Details of the conference–organised by Professor Peter Cane (Cambridge), Professor Jeff King (UCL), and Hayley Hooper (Cambridge)–are available here. Our paper will consider (internal) administrative review systems.