European Law Reporter Articles on Brexit, by Philip Allott and Richard Kirkham

A Luxembourg-based journal I am an editor of–the European Law Reporter–has a new issue out. It features two interesting articles on Brexit from UK scholars: Professor Philip Allott (Professor Emeritus of International Public Law, University of Cambridge) writes on ‘Fundamental Legal Aspects of Withdrawal from the EU: Eight Stages on the Way to a New…

UK Quo Vadis? The EEA as a Workable Framework

On 3 February 2017, the University of Sheffield School of Law—in co-operation with the UK Constitutional Law Association and the European Circuit of the Bar—hosted a seminar. The keynote speaker was Michael-James Clifton, a barrister and now Chef de Cabinet in the Chambers of the President of the EFTA Court, Professor Carl Baudenbacher. The EFTA…

Evidence on Delegated Legislation and the Great Repeal Bill for Commons Procedure Committee

Jake Rylatt (University of Cambridge) and I have submitted written evidence to the Commons Procedure Committee’s inquiry into Delegated Powers in the Great Repeal Act. Our evidence focuses particularly on the possible role of judicial review in relation to delegated legislation. Based on the legal principles identifiable in case law, we argue that the following measures may increase legal certainty by reducing the…

A Design Problem for Judicial Review

I have written a blog article on immigration judicial reviews with Professor Robert Thomas (University of Manchester). The post considers trends in the area and the problems presented by those trends. The article is available via the UK Constitutional Law Blog and the UK Administrative Justice Institute Blog. Dr. Paul Daly (University of Cambridge) has also written a response to this…

Brexit, Administrative Justice, and Human Rights

After the UK’s Brexit vote of June 2016, much of the attention—at least in legal circles—was focused on the Article 50 litigation. But, for all the debate, history is likely to see Miller as no more than a hallmark of a period of relative inactivity before the real reformation of the UK State begins. It is important for legal…

Ouster Clauses Inside-out

I have written a new blog article, published via the UK Constitutional Law Blog, on the debate around ouster clauses. The blog was prompted by last week’s Divisional Court decision in R (Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal [2017] EWHC 114 (Admin). The blog is available here.

Administrative Law After Brexit

I have co-organised, with Sam Karim of Kings Chambers, a seminar on Administrative Law after Brexit. The seminar marks the re-launch of the Northern Administrative Law Association. At the event, the recent Miller decision will be debated and the future of the administrative justice system will be considered. The event will feature Lord Justice Ryder (Senior President…

UK Quo Vadis? The EEA as a Workable Framework

I have arranged a seminar on the future of the UK’s EEA membership post-Brexit, including the Article 127 litigation, that will be held at the University of Sheffield School of Law. The event will take place at 4:30pm on 3 February 2017. The event is in partnership with the UK Constitutional Law Association, the Sheffield…

Institutional Concepts of Administrative Justice

I will be giving a paper entitled ‘Institutional Concepts of Administrative Justice’ at the University of Oxford’s Public Law Discussion Group. The seminar will be at 5pm on January 25th 2017. Information on location will follow on the  Group’s website. The abstract for the paper is as follows: This paper argues for the transfer of an approach…

Miller and the Constitution

I will be speaking at the UKCLA roundtable on 9th of January 2017 (starting at 1.10pm), at University College London. Details of the event are available here. My talk will cover the significance of the UK Supreme Court’s panel size in the Article 50 litigation. It will build upon ideas set out in a blog…

Should there be a fundamental right to administrative justice?

I have published a new blog article via the UK Administrative Justice Institute Blog. It considers whether there should be a fundamental right to administrative justice. It is available here. A PDF version of the article is available to download here.

ESRC Report: Current Issues in Administrative Justice: Examining administrative review, better initial decisions, and tribunal reform

Professor Robert Thomas (University of Manchester) and I have published a new report on current issues in administrative justice. The report emerged out of a research project – entitled ‘Administrative Justice: engaging with government to improve administrative decision-making’ – funded by the Economic and Social Research Council Impact Acceleration Account. That project, and our report,…